We maybe in the dead of Winter, but planning for the upcoming season can help fight around this slow season of gardening.

     I actually started gardening head on in the Spring of 2014.I live in my Grandmother’s house, and this is the same house I truly began to learn how to Garden. Now since its just me here, I won’t be having as much help with the Garden as I have in years past. I moved back into this house in the Fall of 2016. I have been slowly preparing my Garden for the upcoming season.

     I live in Oklahoma and I’ve also done some gardening in East Texas. each zone is different, but the advice I’m giving is a generalized list for all climates. When its above 35 degrees Fahrenheit, I like to go get some Vitamin D (to combat my seasonal depression) and begin prepping for March. On days that there’s snow, ice, or icy-cold-wind, I stay indoors and do some research. This was something I didn’t start doing until last year, and it has helped me tremendously with gardening success.

     I consider going on Pinterest (you can follow me here) a part of research. While I was thinking of unique ways to plan for my Garden, I decided to try to plan an online garden. Usually when I garden, I just plant as I go. As I’ve learned, keeping track of what you plant and where can help with irrigation, harvesting, and for next years garden. I didn’t feel the need to print out a garden map, because I’m starting to print less, and go more Eco-friendly in every way I can.

The first website I went to was helpful for landscaping. For example, I spent ten minutes creating this blueprint on gardena.comThe only reason this wasn’t as helpful, is because I needed to have more focus on the garden, rather than the landscape.

gardena

This is as accurate as my yard gets-digitally.

Traditionally, my family and I have always gardened in rows. Recently, I learned of other unique ways to garden (that does not involve rows). So one way I plan on changing how I’ve done things,  I visited gardeners.com and went to the “Kitchen Garden Planner.” While I’m use to putting Basil in between tomatoes (to help with pest control) but I have seen ways to mix row, creatively.

garden-plot-1

So far, the “Kitchen Herb” pre-planned plot might be the one I plot next to my compost. The other pre-planned plots like “High Yield” and “Cook’s Choice” look nice, too. These plots are (online, anyways) three vegetable squares by six. The picture above is my created plot. While planning, I realized that I don’t have any tomato seeds this year! This garden has always grown tomatoes, so  I’ll take a year off from growing tomatoes.

Now, I also have a flowerbed in front of my house. I considered using this same program for my flowerbed, but I actually already have what I need planted. I will also have a couple of hanging plants, which will most likely have my forget-me-nots

While I was working through my compost, I found a tulip that was growing in the middle of the compost! I re-planted it into this pot with the flower end up, so it can grow easier. Picture below:

TullipCompost.JPG

Two simple tips between now and February 1st:

1. Understand “Companion Planting”

In essence, “companion planting” is knowing what you can plant next to each other for the best yield. I like to make sure that I am able to grow some herbs and vegetables together. Since I don’t have tomatoes, I had to re-plan my garden plot. Because I know you can still plant Basil with peppers, I decided to pair carrots next to them instead. 

2. Check up on your indoor plants

I accomplished this task this afternoon. The original Aloe Vera needed to have its soil changed, because it had started to stick together. While I was tossing the soil, I found two baby Aloe Vera’s growing from the Mother plant! I replanted those baby plants with the still growing sibling plants I have in small pots. Same thing occurred with my Sedum succulent, but because the baby plant was so small (and that I didn’t have another growing Sedum) I kept them together so they can grow. That’s also the header picture for this article-all the baby clippings growing together in the Window space by my front door.

As always, thank you for reading, subscribing, and happy gardening! 

-Danielle

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